Memories of Greenmeadow

by Bob Wells

Bob was born in Panteg Hospital in 1967 and he moved into 8, The Twinings, when he was five. Initially, there were his mother and stepfather and his older brother and younger sister. A few years later the family moved into the four-bedroom house at 10, The Twinings.

After going to school at Fairwater Junior School and Fairwater Comprehensive, Bob got a job in Burtons Biscuit factory… where he learned that he didn’t like working in a factory! He moved to Bournemouth where he lived and worked for 5 years. During this time, he met a woman whose family had moved into 8, The Twinings, after his family had moved out and they got married and had two daughters.

Bob remembers enjoying the Saturday film club at the Threepenny Bit in the 70s, and going to the disco there in about 1980.

Once his street in The Twinings got flooded after a wild downpour. Luckily for Bob’s family, they were in No 10 at the time, which was up a ramp, but the other houses on the row had about 6 inches of water go into them. Everyone from the street, and the rows of houses above and below, came out with brooms to try and clear the water. Then someone noticed that the water was going down one drain, but not another. Bob was watching all this and thinking that there must be a blockage in the middle. Then someone got a spade and whacked it and a stone came through and all the water disappeared from everywhere almost instantly!

There was a proper community on the Byways estate, where there were a lot of kids who were always in and out of each other’s houses, which helped the adults to meet and get to know each other too. The adults in 6 – 16, The Twinings, had coffee mornings every morning where they would save up to take the children on annual trips to Barry. The children used to spend a lot of time playing in the woods and fields and exploring the mountain, including taking food up there to cook during long summer days. They also used to build bonfires on the field every year on Bonfire Night.

 

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